Clinton cancels public appearances

After falling short of the double-digit win she was hoping for in Indiana, Hillary Clinton canceled all public appearances today, which probably means she’s in seclusion with her advisers discussing whether to drop out of the race. If she does, I’m going to be avoiding the blogs of all those male Obama supporters I thought were allies, because I just know there’ll be a million and one “Ding dong, the witch is dead” headlines.

I think Clinton may actually do what Romney did, which is to suspend, but not officially end, his campaign. This maneuver would mean that, while she would no longer be campaigning, her delegates would remain pledged to her into the convention. That way, if Obama did something to sink his own candidacy or all the super delegates suddenly changed their mind about his electability they could, in theory, still throw her the nomination at Denver.

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3 Responses

  1. The facts are tough to ignore: She would have to secure 70% of all remaining delegates (pledged and super) to gain the nomination, her campaign is broke and her supporters are manning the lifeboats.

    It seems it’s not a question of “if” but “when” her run will end.

  2. She would have to secure 70% of all remaining delegates (pledged and super) to gain the nomination

    You know, this is really beside the point. For weeks and weeks, it’s been clear that neither candidate would be able to gain a clinching number of delegates without winning by some ridiculously high percentage in all the remaining states. Obama’s advantage has been that, although he probably wouldn’t be able to clinch the nomination before the convention, it was almost certain that the super delegates would swing for the candidate with the most pledged delegates in order to avoid appearing to undermine the electorate’s wishes. Clinton has known this, and has simply been working to narrow or maintain the delegate gap while trying to find a silver bullet argument that convinces super delegates that Obama is unelectable and they should throw the nomination to her. She hasn’t found that argument, and it doesn’t look like she’s going to. But both candidates need a significant majority of the super delegates’ support to win, which means that, whatever happens in the last few states (assuming both candidates remained in), either would technically have a shot during the convention.

    But yes, you’re right, Clinton probably will drop out of the race. For an example of someone who already agrees with you, see my post above.

  3. Somehow i missed the point. Probably lost in translation 🙂 Anyway … nice blog to visit.

    cheers, Synodical!!

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